Crazy Rich Asians (2018)
#11
(08-14-2018, 01:46 AM)Eggsy Wrote: Really? I thought it was out at the theater nearby my house. Alright, I'll check it out this weekend then. Great to hear it's doing amazing! What are critics saying?

You live in NY so you might have early showings already giveup im jealous.  

The critics are loving it with a 98%. Not that this is surprising tbh
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#12
Just saw this and it was as amazing as I could hope for <3 Constance Wu was amazing, her acting was on point as usual and her character was extremely sympathetic and relatable and super lovable. Henry Golding was super gorgeous and charming as Nick Young, and it was nice to see so many attractive asian men presented in this movie since a lot of times they dont get seen as "manly" or "sexy" in media. I thought the movie really really represented all types of people well, and even though the plot revolves around Nick's #richbitchmom they had no shortage of rich asians who were super sweet and endearing. I loved Astrid for this reason, since she was super well written and I appreciated how she showcased you can be extremely "rich" and still be a kind, caring person despite your exterior being misunderstood. Her husband Michael (Pierre Png) was sooooooo hot but honestly a douchebag. I also adored Awkwafina as Rachel's friend and she was by far the funniest character in the movie. Overall the movie did everything I love about romantic comedies and did it extremely, extremely, well while having an awesome cast & beautiful directing/cinematography. It definitely lived up to the hype for me, just remember that it is a Romantic Comedy and embrace that aspect of it (as most should with Rom Coms). It's definitely one of my faves in the genre.
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#13
I'm glad you enjoyed it! I still really wanna see this.
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#14
This looks really cute and not in the shady way.
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Ser Jaime Lannister. On the breast of his tunic, the lion of his House was embroidered in gold thread, roaring its defiance. they called him the Lion of Lannister to his face and whispered “Kingslayer” behind his back. Jon found it hard to look away from him. “This is what a king should look like”, he thought to himself as he passed
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#15
(09-04-2018, 06:02 PM)DianeSelwyn Wrote: This looks really cute and not in the shady way.

Still shady of you

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#16
still such a huge fan of this
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#17
I saw this recently and it was very funny. Although it played to some romantic tropes and I wish it explored the topics of greed in a more complex way it was a great heartfelt romance movie full of stunning diversity
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#18
Playing true to the romantic tropes is part of why I enjoy it, honestly. I think because the film is a "normal" romantic comedy in that sense makes the story and ideas stronger. For one, the cast lifts this "normality" into something important. Sometimes it is easy to add conditions to films like this, where I feel like losing the recognizable "feel good" romantic comedy tropes would be unfortunate. When we see Constance Wu playing the role that almost went to a white woman, it becomes clear. We aren't watching her struggle with the families because she's "white" as it would have been, she's dealing with them because she's seen as an outsider and an "immigrant". When we play to the tropes that are often played by two white people, it's significant because it's saying they're not the only people that get these types of stories. In many ways the movie plays into these tropes intentionally:

1. Nick's chasing her down to the airport.
2. Disapproving Mother causing stress.
3. The sassy sidekick/best friend.
4. The makeover montage.

It's easy to write these off as just being cliche, but I think so many of these things are written into the movie intentionally so we can see an Asian woman and man in these situations traditionally kept for white men and women. In many ways this is also why the men are sexualized in the film, as it is uncommon that men are presented as sexy and masculine in american cinema.

On another note, that isn't to say the film doesn't subvert expectations & do something new with the formula. Side characters are an important part of cinema, and that's one of this films stronger parts.

Astrid - In many ways her arc is similar to Rachels in that she comes into her own by the end of the film, only somewhat of the reverse. She's not an "outsider", but she married the "outsider". She finds it difficult to be herself around him because he's built up this wall of resentment towards her money, and the fact that shes richer than him. Eventually she learns to stand her ground and stick up for herself and no longer be ashamed of her money.

Nick - Nick is a lot like Astrid, even hiding his money. These charries having mini arcs that connect to the main one (Rachel's) are important for the story. It adds layers & depth to an otherwise "generic" rom com. He generally wants to leave the rich lifestyle, because he appreciates the life he's made with Rachel in New York. Nick is present to represent the idea that you don't need riches to be happy, and ultimately they won't make you happy (see Astrid and Michael, who's issues stem from having too much money).

Peik Lin - We can instantly acknowledge, she doesn't have an "arc". Rather, she is there to showcase "having it all". She shows that riches don't have to cause suffering, that she can be confident & outspoken and true to herself in most situations. She is the "goal" of what most charries can see. This is why she's positioned as the person who has all of the answers, an important piece for the storytelling. Especially regarding her college degree, which her family deems "useless" but she still chased after.

Eleanor - She's perhaps the reverse of Peik Lin, except she has a slight arc toward the end. She is ultimately showing what Rachel could become if she loses sight of herself, and does nothing but try and satisfy her & the family. Since Eleanor has had a rough time due to the marriage, she thinks she is protecting Nick from it- ultimately becoming what she once hated. This is a bit of irony, because Rachel is in many ways like her prior to the years of resentment. At the end Rachel metaphorically beats her at Mahjong (and literally), and tells her she'll leave. This shows Eleanor she truly loves Nick, because she's willing to make the sacrifice.

Mahjong (and why it matters) - the movie opens and closes with mahjong. This is to tell us as the audience that it's important, and informing us something about Rachel and the story as a whole. Mahjong I don't have a lot of history with, but from what I can tell it is a game of strategy, confidence, and self assurance- as well as finding the upper hand on your opponent. Ultimate, Eleanor seems like she has it all together the entire time. She is willing to do anything to get rid of the "issue" in Rachel. This is her problem, because Rachel is instantly able to see she doesn't like her. In the beginning of the segment, the student folds because he assumes he's already lost- when Rachel had nothing worthwhile (winning the game). The ending is the reverse of this in a literal sense. Rachel has all the power, Nick is WILLING to throw away his mother, his family, and his riches all for her. But she tells him no. This is why she tells Eleanor what she's giving up, because she wants her to know that Eleanor didn't "win"- that Rachel is ultimately folding, because she knows she can win. Eleanor's desperation to "protect" her son is what was hurting him the most. Rachel knew that if she accepted the marriage proposal, she would be turning into Eleanor, and that's why she turned it down. She chose to keep Nick from losing his family, which is how she beat Eleanor.

Rachel is the main character, but as we can see it ties into this. Yes the movie may not do as much regarding the romantic comedy tropes, but it doesn't need to. The charries are fleshed out, and fun and enjoyable. They all tie into eachother, which should make the follow up entries even more entertaining as they have a lot more dynamics that keep things interesting and to a degree- less of your traditional rom com.

As far as representing the greed of riches, I think they showed that in the one girl who kept trying to marry into rich families. I think the dynamics between the charries are above the importance of money right now, as they do something different with it. Astrid easily could've been a vapid spoiled "bitch". Ultimately because Rachel is marrying into the riches, it's shown as a mesmerizing and exciting thing at first- only for that to be shut down almost immediately by the reality of the situation. The people are what matter when it comes down to it, not to the parties or the extravagant houses. Many scenes that they glamorize initially become the set pieces of sad situations.

Hyped for the next two films!
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#19
(03-13-2019, 03:26 AM)TheCheetahwings Wrote: Playing true to the romantic tropes is part of why I enjoy it, honestly. I think because the film is a "normal" romantic comedy in that sense makes the story and ideas stronger. For one, the cast lifts this "normality" into something important. Sometimes it is easy to add conditions to films like this, where I feel like losing the recognizable "feel good" romantic comedy tropes would be unfortunate. When we see Constance Wu playing the role that almost went to a white woman, it becomes clear. We aren't watching her struggle with the families because she's "white" as it would have been, she's dealing with them because she's seen as an outsider and an "immigrant". When we play to the tropes that are often played by two white people, it's significant because it's saying they're not the only people that get these types of stories. In many ways the movie plays into these tropes intentionally:

1. Nick's chasing her down to the airport.
2. Disapproving Mother causing stress.
3. The sassy sidekick/best friend.
4. The makeover montage.

It's easy to write these off as just being cliche, but I think so many of these things are written into the movie intentionally so we can see an Asian woman and man in these situations traditionally kept for white men and women. In many ways this is also why the men are sexualized in the film, as it is uncommon that men are presented as sexy and masculine in american cinema.  

On another note, that isn't to say the film doesn't subvert expectations & do something new with the formula. Side characters are an important part of cinema, and that's one of this films stronger parts.

Astrid - In many ways her arc is similar to Rachels in that she comes into her own by the end of the film, only somewhat of the reverse. She's not an "outsider", but she married the "outsider". She finds it difficult to be herself around him because he's built up this wall of resentment towards her money, and the fact that shes richer than him. Eventually she learns to stand her ground and stick up for herself and no longer be ashamed of her money.

Nick - Nick is a lot like Astrid, even hiding his money. These charries having mini arcs that connect to the main one (Rachel's) are important for the story. It adds layers & depth to an otherwise "generic" rom com. He generally wants to leave the rich lifestyle, because he appreciates the life he's made with Rachel in New York. Nick is present to represent the idea that you don't need riches to be happy, and ultimately they won't make you happy (see Astrid and Michael, who's issues stem from having too much money).

Peik Lin - We can instantly acknowledge, she doesn't have an "arc". Rather, she is there to showcase "having it all". She shows that riches don't have to cause suffering, that she can be confident & outspoken and true to herself in most situations. She is the "goal" of what most charries can see. This is why she's positioned as the person who has all of the answers, an important piece for the storytelling. Especially regarding her college degree, which her family deems "useless" but she still chased after.

Eleanor - She's perhaps the reverse of Peik Lin, except she has a slight arc toward the end. She is ultimately showing what Rachel could become if she loses sight of herself, and does nothing but try and satisfy her & the family. Since Eleanor has had a rough time due to the marriage, she thinks she is protecting Nick from it- ultimately becoming what she once hated. This is a bit of irony, because Rachel is in many ways like her prior to the years of resentment. At the end Rachel metaphorically beats her at Mahjong (and literally), and tells her she'll leave. This shows Eleanor she truly loves Nick, because she's willing to make the sacrifice.

Mahjong (and why it matters) - the movie opens and closes with mahjong. This is to tell us as the audience that it's important, and informing us something about Rachel and the story as a whole. Mahjong I don't have a lot of history with, but from what I can tell it is a game of strategy, confidence, and self assurance- as well as finding the upper hand on your opponent. Ultimate, Eleanor seems like she has it all together the entire time. She is willing to do anything to get rid of the "issue" in Rachel. This is her problem, because Rachel is instantly able to see she doesn't like her. In the beginning of the segment, the student folds because he assumes he's already lost- when Rachel had nothing worthwhile (winning the game). The ending is the reverse of this in a literal sense. Rachel has all the power, Nick is WILLING to throw away his mother, his family, and his riches all for her. But she tells him no. This is why she tells Eleanor what she's giving up, because she wants her to know that Eleanor didn't "win"- that Rachel is ultimately folding, because she knows she can win. Eleanor's desperation to "protect" her son is what was hurting him the most. Rachel knew that if she accepted the marriage proposal, she would be turning into Eleanor, and that's why she turned it down. She chose to keep Nick from losing his family, which is how she beat Eleanor.

Rachel is the main character, but as we can see it ties into this. Yes the movie may not do as much regarding the romantic comedy tropes, but it doesn't need to. The charries are fleshed out, and fun and enjoyable. They all tie into eachother, which should make the follow up entries even more entertaining as they have a lot more dynamics that keep things interesting and to a degree- less of your traditional rom com.

As far as representing the greed of riches, I think they showed that in the one girl who kept trying to marry into rich families. I think the dynamics between the charries are above the importance of money right now, as they do something different with it. Astrid easily could've been a vapid spoiled "bitch". Ultimately because Rachel is marrying into the riches, it's shown as a mesmerizing and exciting thing at first- only for that to be shut down almost immediately by the reality of the situation. The people are what matter when it comes down to it, not to the parties or the extravagant houses. Many scenes that they glamorize initially become the set pieces of sad situations.

Hyped for the next two films!

I only read a bit of this and since you threatened to delete I gotta quote for later
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#20
(03-13-2019, 03:38 AM)GoneWasAnyTrace Wrote:
(03-13-2019, 03:26 AM)TheCheetahwings Wrote: Playing true to the romantic tropes is part of why I enjoy it, honestly. I think because the film is a "normal" romantic comedy in that sense makes the story and ideas stronger. For one, the cast lifts this "normality" into something important. Sometimes it is easy to add conditions to films like this, where I feel like losing the recognizable "feel good" romantic comedy tropes would be unfortunate. When we see Constance Wu playing the role that almost went to a white woman, it becomes clear. We aren't watching her struggle with the families because she's "white" as it would have been, she's dealing with them because she's seen as an outsider and an "immigrant". When we play to the tropes that are often played by two white people, it's significant because it's saying they're not the only people that get these types of stories. In many ways the movie plays into these tropes intentionally:

1. Nick's chasing her down to the airport.
2. Disapproving Mother causing stress.
3. The sassy sidekick/best friend.
4. The makeover montage.

It's easy to write these off as just being cliche, but I think so many of these things are written into the movie intentionally so we can see an Asian woman and man in these situations traditionally kept for white men and women. In many ways this is also why the men are sexualized in the film, as it is uncommon that men are presented as sexy and masculine in american cinema.  

On another note, that isn't to say the film doesn't subvert expectations & do something new with the formula. Side characters are an important part of cinema, and that's one of this films stronger parts.

Astrid - In many ways her arc is similar to Rachels in that she comes into her own by the end of the film, only somewhat of the reverse. She's not an "outsider", but she married the "outsider". She finds it difficult to be herself around him because he's built up this wall of resentment towards her money, and the fact that shes richer than him. Eventually she learns to stand her ground and stick up for herself and no longer be ashamed of her money.

Nick - Nick is a lot like Astrid, even hiding his money. These charries having mini arcs that connect to the main one (Rachel's) are important for the story. It adds layers & depth to an otherwise "generic" rom com. He generally wants to leave the rich lifestyle, because he appreciates the life he's made with Rachel in New York. Nick is present to represent the idea that you don't need riches to be happy, and ultimately they won't make you happy (see Astrid and Michael, who's issues stem from having too much money).

Peik Lin - We can instantly acknowledge, she doesn't have an "arc". Rather, she is there to showcase "having it all". She shows that riches don't have to cause suffering, that she can be confident & outspoken and true to herself in most situations. She is the "goal" of what most charries can see. This is why she's positioned as the person who has all of the answers, an important piece for the storytelling. Especially regarding her college degree, which her family deems "useless" but she still chased after.

Eleanor - She's perhaps the reverse of Peik Lin, except she has a slight arc toward the end. She is ultimately showing what Rachel could become if she loses sight of herself, and does nothing but try and satisfy her & the family. Since Eleanor has had a rough time due to the marriage, she thinks she is protecting Nick from it- ultimately becoming what she once hated. This is a bit of irony, because Rachel is in many ways like her prior to the years of resentment. At the end Rachel metaphorically beats her at Mahjong (and literally), and tells her she'll leave. This shows Eleanor she truly loves Nick, because she's willing to make the sacrifice.

Mahjong (and why it matters) - the movie opens and closes with mahjong. This is to tell us as the audience that it's important, and informing us something about Rachel and the story as a whole. Mahjong I don't have a lot of history with, but from what I can tell it is a game of strategy, confidence, and self assurance- as well as finding the upper hand on your opponent. Ultimate, Eleanor seems like she has it all together the entire time. She is willing to do anything to get rid of the "issue" in Rachel. This is her problem, because Rachel is instantly able to see she doesn't like her. In the beginning of the segment, the student folds because he assumes he's already lost- when Rachel had nothing worthwhile (winning the game). The ending is the reverse of this in a literal sense. Rachel has all the power, Nick is WILLING to throw away his mother, his family, and his riches all for her. But she tells him no. This is why she tells Eleanor what she's giving up, because she wants her to know that Eleanor didn't "win"- that Rachel is ultimately folding, because she knows she can win. Eleanor's desperation to "protect" her son is what was hurting him the most. Rachel knew that if she accepted the marriage proposal, she would be turning into Eleanor, and that's why she turned it down. She chose to keep Nick from losing his family, which is how she beat Eleanor.

Rachel is the main character, but as we can see it ties into this. Yes the movie may not do as much regarding the romantic comedy tropes, but it doesn't need to. The charries are fleshed out, and fun and enjoyable. They all tie into eachother, which should make the follow up entries even more entertaining as they have a lot more dynamics that keep things interesting and to a degree- less of your traditional rom com.

As far as representing the greed of riches, I think they showed that in the one girl who kept trying to marry into rich families. I think the dynamics between the charries are above the importance of money right now, as they do something different with it. Astrid easily could've been a vapid spoiled "bitch". Ultimately because Rachel is marrying into the riches, it's shown as a mesmerizing and exciting thing at first- only for that to be shut down almost immediately by the reality of the situation. The people are what matter when it comes down to it, not to the parties or the extravagant houses. Many scenes that they glamorize initially become the set pieces of sad situations.

Hyped for the next two films!

I only read a bit of this and since you threatened to delete I gotta quote for later

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